MG Pictures by Various Artists

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The title of this page says it all, really. Most are MG racers, one or two record breakers included, and a few are road-going MGs. The era covered is from the 1930s through to the late 1950s, with the individual artists ranging from F. Gordon Crosby and Bryan de Grineau, working in the 30s, to contemporary artists such as the renowned Alan Fearnley and Klaus Wagger.

There’s a brief section on F. Gordon Crosby at the foot of the page – please scroll down.
Most are good quality scans – please forgive the few which are not quite 100%! If anybody can correct any errors in the captions below, or fill in missing details, please mail me at  stuart((at))lsak.fsnet.co.uk.
Anyway, browse through them – I do hope you find some you like. Click on each caption . . .

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“The Four of Us”. A picnic in the English countryside in the 1930’s with an MG L2 Magna. By Alan Fearnley.
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By Alan Fearnley.

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From “The Luck of the Game – Again” by BarrĂ© Lyndon, published by the MG Car Company, telling the story of the 1934 TT. The winning N-type Magnette. By Bryan de Grineau.
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A typical MG garage. By F. Gordon Crosby. Probably a J2, although the registration number appears to be from 1931 – the J2 was not around till mid-1932.
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“Moonlight Magnette”. By Roy Putt. In his words, “One of the most desirable MGs ever made, this K3 011 was purchased new in 1933 by British racing driver Whitney Straight, who raced it extensively. It was then raced by Richard Seaman and Reggie Tongue. In 1935 it was purchased by Sam Collier who shipped it to the USA.I saw K3 011 at rest in the paddock at Silverstone after a day’s competition during The Coy’s International Historic Festival, just as the light was fading. The deep blue sky of evening was reflecting in the shiny black paintwork as the lights came on and the moon began to rise”
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F.Gordon Crosby sketching at Brooklands in the late 1930s, with his elder son, Peter Gordon Crosby, standing behind him. Peter, who was an accomplished artist before he was twenty, died flying a P51 Mustang during the War and his Father never recovered from the loss; tragically, he took his life during a period of illness in 1943.
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He was the chief artist at The Autocar for many years, with FGC originals now selling for many thousands of pounds. He also designed the Jaguar Leaper mascot in bronze for William Lyons, the Bentley Flying B badge and Icarus mascot for W O Bentley and the Brooklands 120mph badge, that below being the badge awarded to Captain Sir Malcolm Campbell in 1930.

 

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